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Dig for Victory: Back to square one

I visited the allotment this evening and wasn’t surprised with what I saw. It’s been a fair while since I’ve been there. During the past few weeks I’ve been in-and-out of hospital trying to get to the bottom of the pain in my stomach, just under my left ribs. All the tests have been done but I’m still awaiting the results. The problem is when I bend over, the pain gets worse so the prospect of weeding hasn’t been attractive.

It’s a large plot and somewhat overwhelming at the moment. I need to spend a full day and strim the grass and weeds down to the ground. Whether to cover the majority of it in black plastic or spray it to keep the weeds down. Whatever I decide, something has to be done.

I need to commit to visit on a weekly basis and at least start the task of getting it sorted by doing a little but doing it often.

About Sean James Cameron

Based in London, Sean has been gardening since being a teenager. Although vegetables and fruit is the main passion, there is also room for flowers.

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  • Sue Cresswell

    wish I was closer so I could come and help. Also I sympathise about your tummy I have a similar pain in a similar place it has been put down to IBS. I really hope it is all ok for you in the end. You look well enough if that is any hep
    🙂

    • Hopefully we’ll get to the bottom of it very soon. Many thanks.

  • Susan Scholtz

    I can sympathise. I don’t have a pain in my stomach, but bending does bring on some problems…. I also have a lot of grass to deal with at my plot, and it has to be dug out by the roots… which form a veritable NET for about 6-8 inches under the ground!. It is a nightmare. I also live 10 miles away, so doing a little is fine, but I have a problem with “often”.

    • Will get there in the end at some point, hopefully.

  • Terra Nova Dave

    Sean, it doesn’t take long for nature to crank up and take over a plot. I’m in constant weeding mode with my garden. I’m on a 10 day holiday now and wonder what I will see when I return. I tried to set up some automatic watering while I’m away so I’m hoping the garden plants will stay ahead of the weeds.

    Good thoughts, wishes, and prayers headed your way for your health to return.

  • Stacey

    Hi Sean, Wanted to pass on an idea to you. For many years, I have used a canned gas torch to remove weeds on the paths between my 20 raised beds. I carry a small tank on a strap over my shoulder and the torch extends about 30″ from my hand and is very lightweight. The flame is so hot that it is invisible, but it obliterates weeds in less than a second. I just pass the flame over the weeds, about 2″ to 3″ from the ground and keep the torch moving at all times. The weeds shrivel instantly, but the best part is the roots die too! A day later and everything is dried up and can be raked very easily and lightly. Recently, I decided to clear a large space –about 10′ by 20′– and dreaded the thought of digging out the sod, turning the soil, etc. Just for the heck of it, I mowed the space and then I decided to walk back and forth slowly, always moving, with the torch, and managed to kill off every weed in about 20 minutes. It’s brilliant. Perhaps you could try to clear your plot this way? Mow it first, then gently burn off the weeds and their roots. I must say, my paths are wood chips and the beds are wood, too, but nothing even gets charred. The heat is so brief, but so intense, the weed plant is just destroyed in less than a second. You can get these torches on Amazon for about $70 USD. You could also use it on your other plot to keep your paths clear and straighten up the weedy areas, if you wish. Regardless, good luck! It may save your back, too!